What Happens When The Cyber Alarms Don’t Work?

What Happens When The Cyber Alarms Don’t Work?

Over half of all organizations assume that their IT networks have been penetrated, or will be in the future. The number of IT professionals admitting that they really don’t have complete control over sensitive systems and data is increasing each year.

The First Line of Defense Has Already Fallen

Perimeter detection is the first line of defense against any attack, whether it be physical, think an alarm going off when security in your home is breached, or an ATM blocking your back card if there have been too many incorrect PIN entries. The issue currently facing many IT experts, security analysts and information security professionals is that there has previously been an over reliance on perimeter detection as the ONLY line of defense. Not only are cyber-attacks completely bypassing perimeter detection, a recent survey reported that up to 30% of all security breaches never triggered the virtual alarms, but that preventative discovery is close to non-existent in many organizations.

What is even more alarming is what happens after a security breach.cyber bypass detection

The speed with which an organization reacts after a breach is vital in not only securing sensitive information but in examining and investigating exactly what happened, finding the compromised end-points and determining the full data risk impact as fast as possible. The problem is that most organizations are reactive instead of proactively aggressive in their search for potential threats at all times. In the same survey, it was noted that up to 25% of IT security professionals were notified of data breaches and cyber-attacks by a 3rd party. By then it could be too late.
Figuring out what happened after the fact is essential. Yes. Creating a secure environment that STOPS attacks is even more vital. To do that security professionals need to be vigilant, proactive and relentless in their hunt for cyber threats before they become cyber casualties of war.

Flash Player zero-day vulnerability

Flash Player zero-day vulnerability

As indicated in FortiGuard Advisory FGA-2010-53, an attack exploiting a critical zero-day vulnerability in Adobe Flash Player was found very recently roaming in the wild. Although the attack vector in the wild is a PDF file, it is a Flash Player vulnerability indeed (Adobe Reader embeds a Flash Player).

After analyzing the PDF sample, we do confirm that the core ActionScript in the embeded flash file, which triggers the exploit, is almost exactly the same as that of an example on flashamdmath.com, as Bugix Security guessed.

Almost? Indeed: the only difference lies in a single byte (at 0x494A, for those who’d like to make a signature based on that ;)), changed from 0×16 in the example to 0×07 in the exploit code:

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What does this correspond to? Simply to an ActionScript Class id sitting in the “MultiName” part of the file (According to Adobe’s ActionScript Virtual Machine 2 Overview):

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So, the original fl.controls::RadioButtonGroup class in the example becomes a fl.controls::Button class in the sample. Thus, at runtime, all references that are supposed to point to fl.controls::RadioButtonGroup actually refer to fl.controls::Button… which, somewhere below, triggers the vulnerability:

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Based on this, it is not extremely challenging to guess how the attacker discovered this 0day vulnerability: Simply by running a “dummy” fuzzer on basic flash files, as many bug hunters are doing. We had already noticed the same thing likely happened for CVE-2010-1297 and CVE-2010-2884.

Spying Malware Detected in Biomedical Company

Spying Malware Detected in Biomedical Company

Security experts have recently discovered a previously unknown Mac-based spy malware that preys on outdated coding practices to launch real-world attacks on computers in the biomedical research industry.

The unsophisticated and out-of-date code has remained undetected for years on macOS systems. The malware has been labelled Fruitfly and it was first discovered as ‘OSX.Backdoor.Quimitchin’. An IT administrator working for information security firm Malwarebytes was alerted to the malware due to unusual outgoing activity sourced from a Mac computer.

The First Malware of 2017

Researchers are labelling the Fruitfly the first Mac Malware of 2017. Fruitfly is said to contain code dating back to OS X and it has been conducting surveillance on targeted networks for over two years. Fruitfly uses a hidden pearl script which communicates with command and control servers. Disturbingly for targeted biomed companies, Fruitfly can capture webcam, screenshots, grab system uptime while moving and clicking the mouse cursor.

Fruitfly’s reach can extend to connected devices in the same network as the corrupted Mac as it attempts to connect to these also. Fruitfly uses a secondary script along with Java class to conceal its icon from displaying in the macOS Dock. It’s still unknown how the malware was distributed and infected the Macs.

Code Dating from 1998Shimon sheves- mac malware

Researchers have found that the malware’s code pre-dates Apple’s OS X and that it is running on “libjpeg” code, JPEG-formatted images files that were last updated almost 20 years ago in 1998.

How Has it Gone Undetected for so Long?

In a blog post written by Malwarebytes’ Thomas Reed, he speculated that Fruitfly has been used selectively in very tightly targeted attacks which have limited its exposure. International espionage is a buzz topic right now and the nature of this form of attack is a hallmark of past Russian and Chinese attacks aimed at US and European scientific research.

Cyber ‘War’ Games Highlight Vital Security Flaws

Cyber ‘War’ Games Highlight Vital Security Flaws

There is a reason that the military conducts repeated simulated training exercises: To ensure that the armed forces will be able to respond to military attacks immediately and effectively. Little wonder then that governments around the world have been doing the same when it comes to a nation’s cyber security. Interestingly, that while the threat of a physical invasion of any western country decreases each year, the threat of cyber-attacks, increases dramatically. A cyber-attack has the potential to decimate many countries’ vital systems including transport, infrastructure (power, water, banking, and healthcare) and ‘cyber war games’ help governments plan against attacks, increase security and lower the chance of complete decimation.

The Cyber Storm – 2006 War Games Begin

One of the earliest tactical training exercises and simulated ‘war games’ was called ‘Cyber Storm’ which took place over the course of a week in February 2006. It was the first ever cyber security exercise to take place and enabled the Department of Homeland Security to prepare for future attacks by highlighting vulnerabilities and weaknesses not only in electronic systems, but in their response to an attack.

Cyber Storm – Attacks on All Fronts

One of the principal objectives was to ascertain the preparedness and response times of different systems and departments to an attack on all fronts. The simulation sought to disrupt key targets, and thwart the government’s ability to respond. Unfortunately it was successful.
The controlled and simulated attack was leveraged against key targets around the world including Washington DC’s metro transport system, hazardous materials in Philadelphia, Chicago and on London’s Underground. People on ‘no-fly’ lists appearing at several airports across the US, utility disruption in Los Angeles and planes flying too close to strategic targets.
The outcome of the exercise highlighted the inability of systems and departments to connect attacks fast enough and not being able to focus on the entirety of the attack, but rather on specific incidences. Overall it was found that, if under cyber-attack, the US may not be able to adequately defend itself fast enough.

What Is the Stegano Exploit Kit and How to Avoid It

What Is the Stegano Exploit Kit and How to Avoid It

Avoid Stegano – Just Don’t Click

Think twice before you click on any adverts while browsing your favourite websites. The latest malicious software has been found embedded in banner adverts on high profile news and information sites.

Stegano – the Exploit Kit That Takes over Your Systemshimon sheves - cyber

Traditional viruses have been known to exploit local systems, infiltrate files and even corrupt hard drives. Stegano takes cybercrime one step further by distributing a malicious software exploit kit called DNSChanger in your computer. This infamous code kit made its first appearance back in 2012, infecting millions of computers.

How DNSChanger Works to Cause Mayhem

As hinted by its name, once it has infiltrated your computer this vicious exploit kit works by changing DNS server entries and pointing them at servers that are controlled by the cyber attackers. In other words, once your computer is infected, you may think you’re going to your daily news site, or social media website, but in actuality, you’re being redirected to a fake site where your personal information may be compromised.

It Gets Worse…

The combination of Stegano and DNSChanger also enables attackers to gain control over your unsecured routers. So far we know of more than 166 models that are vulnerable to the attacks. Makes that have been affected include: D-Link, NetGear, COMTREND ADSL Router and Pirelli. Once the virus is in your router, all devices connected to it – tablets, phones, gaming consoles, etc. – are in danger. Though the scope of the damage caused by the Segano-DNSChanger combo is yet to be uncovered, previous attacks have been known to infect over a million devices per day.

How to Protect Yourself Against AttacksShimon Sheves - firewall

First of all – do not click on ads and banners, no matter how legitimate they seem, no matter how trustworthy the site hosting them is, just don’t. Next – make sure that your router software is up to date and ensure that your router password is strong enough to withstand a brute force attack. You could also try disabling your remote admin settings and updating or changing your local IP address to help combat any malicious software gaining entry to your system.